Katze Laboratory Bannner Image

People

Katze Lab Group Photo

Principal Investigator

Katze
Michael Katze, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator
honey@uw.edu
Dr. Katze is Professor of Microbiology and Associate Director for Molecular Sciences and Core Staff Scientist at the Washington National Primate Research Center. He has studied virus-host interactions for more than 30 years and is a leader in applying systems biology approaches to infectious disease research. He is an author of over 270 papers and reviews, over half of which are related to the use of high-throughput and computational methods. He has received the Milstein Award from the International Society of Interferon and Cytokine Research for his contributions to the interferon field and the prestigious Dozor Scholar Award by the Israeli Microbiology Society. Dr. Katze heads a laboratory of over 35 individuals that is focused on using high-throughput technologies and computational methods to model and understand the complex interplay between viruses and the cells they infect.

Administrative Team

Rose Howard
Rose Howard
Lab Administrator
rmhoward@uw.edu
Rose has worked in Research, Management and Patient Care Services for nearly 20 years at the University of Washington. Rose loves traveling, riding her motorcycle, spending time with her beautiful granddaughter, husband, friends and dog. She believes you get back in life what you put into it, she lives by the motto you are only passing though life once so have no regrets and do what you want.."
Jacqueline Perry
Jacqueline Perry
Program Coordinator
jacqp@uw.edu
Jacqueline has worked in Research Management and Finance for nearly 10 years and feels honored to be a part of the University. Jacqueline is a Mother of 3 beautiful young girls. She loves traveling, cooking asian cuisine, being anywhere near the water, and surfing. She believes greatness is the ability to affect those around you positively.

Senior Scientists and Fellows

Fredrik Barrenas, Ph.D.
Fredrik Barrenas, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow
barrenas@uw.edu
"When Thomas Edison worked late into the night on the electric light, he had to do it by gas lamp or candle. I'm sure it made the work seem that much more urgent." -George Carlin
 
 

Sarah Belisle, Ph.D.
Sarah Belisle, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist
sbelisle@uw.edu
Dr. Belisle is a senior scientist in the Katze Lab. She holds a BS in biology (Tufts Univ.), a MS and Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Nutrition (Tufts Univ) and a certificate in Biotechnology Project Management (Univ of Washington). Dr. Belisle has a background in experimental and clinical investigations of infectious disease, and in the analysis of complex data sets. She provides analytical, project management and administrative support to the laboratory. When not at work, you can find Sarah walking her dogs, practicing and teaching yoga, and running.
Adriana Forero, Ph.D.
Adriana Forero, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow
forera@uw.edu
Adriana Forero is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Katze lab. Adriana holds a BA in Biology from Wesleyan College and a PhD in Molecular Virology and Microbiology from the University of Pittsburgh. Her graduate work focused on the interplay between interferon regulatory factors (IRF) and DNA tumor viruses. In the Katze lab, she is interested in further understanding the host response to viral infection and identifying signatures associated with pathogenesis. Outside of lab she enjoys reading, biking, and dancing.
Marcus Korth, Ph.D.
Marcus Korth, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist
korth@uw.edu
Dr. Korth is interested in technical and medical writing and the effective communication of scientific concepts in grants, contracts, and the professional literature. His doctoral research focused on the role of fimbrial adhesins in Escherichia coli pathogenesis and his post-doctoral work characterized the PKR kinase inhibitor and molecular chaperone P58IPK. He is a member of the American Medical Writers Association and holds a BA in psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, a BS in microbiology and BSMT in medical technology from the University of Montana, and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Washington.
Stanley Langevin, Ph.D.
Stanley Langevin, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist
slangevi@uw.edu
Dr. Langevin is a senior research scientist in the Katze Lab. He holds a BS in biology from Colorado State University and a Ph.D. in comparative pathology from UC Davis. Dr. Langevin’s research interests focus on characterizing microbial-host interactions that define pathogenicity, virus discovery, the evolution of emerging RNA viruses and interspecies transmission dynamics. Outside of work, he enjoys spending time with family, snowboarding, scuba diving, and traveling.
Lynn Law, Ph.D.
Lynn Law, Ph.D.
NHP-FGC Project Manager
gllaw@uw.edu
Dr. Law joined the Katze lab in 2008 after 15 years of basic research in the fields of transcriptional and translational control in mammalian systems. She holds a BS in chemistry from the University of Colorado and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Washington State University. She is interested in pushing forward new methods utilizing systems biology approaches to better understand pathogen-host interactions. Following the motto – work hard, play hard – she also spends time sea kayaking, river rafting, hiking and bird watching.
Juliet Morrison, Ph.D.
Juliet Morrison, Ph.D.
Project Manager - Emerging Infectious Disease Studies
jumo@uw.edu
Dr. Morrison is interested in combining classical virology and computational biology to provide an overarching view of what happens in a cell or a whole organism during a viral infection. Her PhD research at Columbia University centered on picornavirus inhibition of the interferon response, while her postdoctoral work at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai focused on innate immune responses to flaviviruses such as dengue virus and yellow fever virus. Though she has concentrated on RNA viruses thus far, she is broadly interested in all classes of infectious agents. When she is not studying virus-host interactions, Dr. Morrison mentors young scientists and designs science education tools.
Atsu Okumura, Ph.D.
Atsu Okumura, Ph.D.
Research Scientist
okumuraa@uw.edu
"Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning." -Albert Einstein
 
 
 

Angela Rasmussen, Ph.D.
Angela Rasmussen, Ph.D.
Project Manager of CRDD CETR
arasmus@uw.edu
Dr. Rasmussen's interests and expertise focus on translational studies of medically relevant and emerging viruses in multiple experimental models. Her doctoral work focused on isolating mouse-adapted rhinovirus variants. Her postdoctoral work identified critical host molecules regulating HCV and HIV infection both in vitro and in patients. She also employs systems methods to identify features of pathogenesis and identify potential drug targets for many emerging or highly pathogenic viruses, including dengue, Ebola, Lassa, Lujo, Middle East-CoV, and H7N9 influenza. She holds a BA from Smith College, and a MA, M.Phil, and PhD in Microbiology from Columbia University.
Christian Selinger, Ph.D.
Christian Selinger, Ph.D.
Postdoc Fellow
csel@uw.edu
Christian Selinger is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Katze Lab. He has been studying mathematics at the universities of Vienna, Paris and Luxembourg and obtained his PhD in probability theory and geometry. Transforming exciting virological data into biological statements with the goal of understanding why and how viral infection perturbs complex biological systems and causes disease often takes a long road with plenty of challenging opportunities to bring mathematics and microbiology together. Besides science he enjoys hiking, playing music and spending time with his family.
Pavel Sova, Ph.D.
Pavel Sova, Ph.D.
Research Scientist
ps44@uw.edu
Pavel Sova came to Katze lab in 2009 as a virologist. He has an extensive experience working with viruses including HIV, Epstein-Barr virus, human cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, vaccinia virus, flu, and dengue virus. Prior to joining the Katze lab, in addition to his work with viruses he has been involved in cancer genomics/epigenomics focusing on development of methylation biomarkers for early detection of cervical cancer, in genomics of nonhuman primates, and in development of oncolytic adenoviral vectors. When not in the lab, Pavel enjoys climbing or skiing Cascade peaks and volcanoes, and spending time with his family.
Nicolas Tchitchek, Ph.D.
Nicolas Tchitchek, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow
ntchi@uw.edu
Nicolas Tchitchek did his Ph.D. in Systems Biology with a focus on the development of new statistical and representation methods for the analysis of –omics data. He joined the Katze Lab in March 2012 and is mainly working on the kinetics aspects of the pulmonary host response in mice infected by influenza viruses. His research also focuses on gene co-expression networks to better characterize the most important components of the host response system. Nicolas is also working on the design and implementation of several databases for the dissemination of scientific results.
Jenny Tisoncik Go, Ph.D.
Jenny Tisoncik Go, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist
tisoncik@uw.edu
Dr. Go is applying systems approaches to the study of pathogen-host interactions. In particular, she is interested in modeling the acute phase response during H1N1 pandemic influenza infection for a global understanding of transcriptome regulation leading to viral pathogenesis and severe respiratory disease. Toward this end, she is directing collaborative, multidisciplinary projects in functional genomics, including microarray and next-generation sequencing studies utilizing in vitro and in vivo model systems, and providing biological interpretation of high-throughput ‘omics datasets. She obtained her Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology from the University of Illinois at Chicago where she examined influenza NA inhibitor resistance. Dr. Go maintains an active interest in science education, and has been actively engaged in student science research mentoring programs.
Nitzan Tzanani, Ph.D.
Nitzan Tzanani, Ph.D.
Visiting Senior Scientist
nitzant@uw.edu
"If it ain't worth doing it, it ain't worth talking about it."
 
 
 
 

Yajie Yang, Ph.D.
Yajie Yang, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow
yajiey@uw.edu
Dr. Yang is interested in viral host interactions and in understanding how gene regulatory networks are co-opted and deregulated in diseases. Her doctoral work studied the genome-wide regulatory effect of a viral microRNA in different human cell types, on which she worked from the initial bench science through the data analysis and had broad training that encompasses the molecular and bioinformatic. In the Katze lab she will continue to unravel the gene regulatory networks using systems approaches. She earned her B.S. in Biology from Huazhong Agriculture University in China, Ph.D. in Genetics and Genomics from University of Florida.

Research Scientists

Victoria Carter
Victoria Carter
Research Scientist
victoria@uw.edu
Victoria joined the Katze lab in 1999. She brought with her 12 years of experience in Tropical medicine at Seattle Biomedical, where she primarily did protein chemistry and Kinase regulation studies using a Trypanosoma brucei model. Vickie has spent the last 15 years happily focused on studying the world’s deadliest viruses. She is now a research scientist III with a total of 31 papers, 24 of those done in the Katze lab. To express her creative side, she has run a home based photography studio for over 20 years. She also enjoys hiking with her dogs, herding her grandson, reading on the beach, and photographing anything and everything.
Jean Chang
Jean Chang
Research Scientist
mspiggy1@uw.edu
Jean earned her B.S. from University of Washington. She joined the Katze lab in October 2008. Prior to that, Jean was in Biology creating fosmid libraries from algae and University of Washington Genome Center working on BAC shotgun and fosmid libraries as part of the human genome sequencing project. She has been working mainly on system virology samples in the lab till 2013. Jean enjoys reading in her free time.
Jean Chang
Sara Kelly
Research Scientist
smkelly@uw.edu
Sara Kelly joined the Katze Lab as a Research Scientist in January 2010. She has a BA in Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz where her studies focused on Marine and Molecular Biology. Sara’s interest shifted to Microbiology shortly after graduating when she joined Dr. William Fenical’s Lab at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The focus of Dr. Fenical’s lab is the discovery of medicinally valuable compounds derived from marine microorganisms. Her work with marine microbes led her to Portland State University where she studied microbial ecology of extremophiles, specifically bacteria capable of surviving in hydrothermal vents. In addition to science, Sara loves exploring the outdoors with her family, and pursuing her passion for photography.
Elise Smith
Elise Smith
Research Scientist
eliser2@uw.edu
Elise earned her B.S. from Western Washington University. She joins the lab after working in the Biochemistry Department at the UW, where she worked on Ribosomal Footprinting and was introduced to the wonderful world of next generation sequencing. When not in the lab, Elise enjoys spending time with her family, playing tennis and soccer, and hiking.
Matthew Thomas
Matthew Thomas
Research Scientist
mnkyboy@uw.edu
Matt earned his B.S. from the University of Utah and then moved to Seattle over 10 years ago via a few years in Portland, Oregon. He has applied his experience of macaque models and molecular biology to next generation sequencing methodologies. Matt has been in the Katze Lab for a total for ten years, with a stint in local biotech in between. He enjoys computers, weight lifting, and herpetology as a hobbies and lives with his wife, two boys, and two cats in Shoreline, Washington.
Marlene Wambach
Marlene Wambach
Research Scientist
wambach@uw.edu
Marlene received her B.S. in Medical Technology at Seattle University. She has been employed at the University of Washington for many years. She worked in several departments before joining the Katze lab in 1987, the year Dr. Katze moved to Seattle to set up his lab. She originally worked at the bench doing research, but now manages several areas of the lab including compliance with safety regulations. Marlene and her husband are both from the Midwest and enjoy spending time with friends and family there as well as in Seattle.
Jeffrey Weiss
Jeffrey Weiss
Research Scientist
jmw54@uw.edu
Jeff has always had an interest in biology, particularly the littlest creatures. Having received his B.S. in Biology from Rutgers University and an M.S. in Microbiology from Cornell, Jeff has worked on a wide range of topics ranging from fermentation biology at Merck, microarray development at Michigan State Univ., and cancer drug development at Nereus Pharmaceuticals. Jeff joined the Katze Lab in January 2010 and enjoys working on his house, cooking, gardening and hiking in his free time.
Chris Williams
Chris Williams
Research Scientist
chrisw86@uw.edu
Chris first entered the Katze lab as an undergraduate research intern in 2010, where he conducted research in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of Rab1a in an HCV infection. He graduated in 2012 with a BS in Cellular, Molecular and Developmental biology with an emphasis in mathematics and microbiology from the University of Washington. After graduation he joined the lab as a full time Research Scientist. He currently works on a variety of projects involving a systems biology approach to understanding the progression of infectious disease in several experimental models. He has a serious passion for science and virology and hopes to continue his education in the field. Outside of research he enjoys weight-lifting, hiking, climbing and photography.

Research Technologists

Cecilia Boyer
Cecilia Boyer
Research Technologist
cboyer@uw.edu
Cecilia assists with laboratory support operations by performing duties as required or assigned by the research scientists. She enjoys working with such a dedicated group of scientists in the Katze Lab. Cecilia and her husband Earl have one son. In her leisure time, she enjoys dancing Mexican Folkdances and she is part of a Mexican dance group. She likes to paint with watercolor and oil media and enjoys doing other crafts as well. She’s been told that she cooks delicious Mexican dishes!
Socorro Ortiz
Socorro Ortiz
Research Technologist
sortiz@uw.edu
Socorro provides basic support for the laboratory, including stocking supplies and making solutions. She is happy to be part of this dynamic laboratory that has so much to offer. Socorro loves to travel to Mexico and visit her family and friends whenever she is able! She enjoys cooking, knitting and enjoy life with friends.

Students

Gabriella Veytsel
Gabriella Veytsel
Student Worker
gev2@uw.edu
I'm from Chicago, Illinois. I'm a sophomore at the University of Washington, pursuing a BS in Public Health. I'm really interested in the epidemiology of infectious diseases. In my free time, I love traveling, reading, and playing sports.

Bioinformatics and Information Technology

Chris Gray
Chris Gray
Senior Computer Specialist
graycm@uw.edu
Chris joined the Katze Lab in August, 2012. He graduated from Pacific Lutheran University with a BS in Computer Science, and chose to go into the IT field. Chris has provided support for over ten years, including at Pacific Lutheran University, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Being part of organizations that are changing the world for the better is one of the ways Chris fulfills his mantra of, "One person can make a difference." When not working, Chris enjoys spending time with family, friends, hiking, and bowling.
Richard Green
Richard Green
Computational Research Scientist
greener@uw.edu
Richard Green began his career as an intern at Barlow Scientific, a small biotech company in Olympia Washington. In 1998 he joined the molecular cloning group at the HTSC (High Throughput Sequencing Center) in UW’s Department of Molecular Biotechnology run by Dr. Leroy Hood. During his time there, the lab sequenced the rice plant genome and contributed sequencing efforts to other genomes (human, dog, soybean and others). After completing his Masters in Bioinformatics in Boston he joined the University of Washington Medical Center and worked in Bioinformatics and Proteomics for Dr. Jay Heinecke until 2009 when he joined the Computational Biologist's group in Michael Katze's lab. Richard is interested in using computational methods to solve biological problems.
Brendan Henry
Brendan Henry
Informatics Manager
bthenry@uw.edu
Brendan came to the Katze lab in November 2012 after working as an IT manager in the Genome Sciences Department. Brendan holds a BA from the University of Arizona and originates from Tucson, AZ. He has been in the IT field since 1997, working for internet and biotech startup companies. Brendan taught English for three years in Japan and has traveled extensively in eastern Asia. His personal interests include bocce, boardgames, books and pinball.
Dale Murphy
Dale Murphy
Senior Computer Specialist
defm@uw.edu
Dale spent the majority of his IT career as the tactical and strategic lead for anti-virus and intrusion prevention efforts for the 2nd largest private network in the United States. Seeking both work in the Linux and Open Source world, along with the beauty and culture of the Pacific Northwest, he moved to Seattle and was excited to find he could help the fight against viruses of the biological kind at the University of Washington. When not working on the infrastructure of the Katze lab, Dale can found hiking and exploring Seattle, the northwest, and as often as possible, abroad.
Xinxia Peng
Xinxia Peng, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor
xinxiap@uw.edu
Dr. Peng has a multidisciplinary background with undergraduate and graduate degrees in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Foods and Nutrition, and Computer Science. He received his Ph.D. in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics from UT-ORNL Graduate School of Genome Science and Technology. Prior to joining the Katze laboratory in 2008, he worked for 3 years as Bioinformatics Manager at the Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (now Seattle BioMed). He is interested in systems analysis of host responses, and getting involved early in experimental design. He is interested in developing computational solutions for applying new technologies.
Sean Proll
Sean Proll
Bioinformatics Manager
proll@uw.edu
"Specialized meaninglessness has come to be regarded, in certain circles, as a kind of hallmark of true science." -Aldous Huxley
Dale Murphy
Hao Xiong, Ph.D.
Computational Research Scientist
haoxiong@uw.edu
Hao Xiong has a B.S. degree from University of Houston and Ph.D. degree from Texas A&M University in computer science. Afterward he did postdoc at UCSF and UC Berkeley. Modeling biological networks as dynamic systems, differential expression of pathways, sensitivity analysis of metabolic pathways are among his Ph.D. works. Later he built classifiers for nucleosome occupancy and developed functional QTL mapping for time course phenotypes. For next generation sequencing data, he has new methods for differential expression and allele-specific expression analysis. Outside of work, he enjoys jogging, reading, and programming.